Teaching Workshops

Department of Criminal Justice
Temple University
Spring 2009

on the web at:
www/rbtaylor.net/teach_sp09.htm
instructor main web site: www.rbtaylor.net 

Date of last update: 2/12/09

UPDATE BOX
Important information updates will appear in this box

Mid course correction - please see memo dated 2/12/09 CLICK HERE

 
Basics  
Workshop Series Goals  
Your commitment / prerequisites  
Your "grade"  
What are my alternatives?  
Uses of Blackboard  
Disclaimer  
Statement on electronic disruptors  
Sequence of topics, readings  
Assignments  
Main reading sources  
More resources  
 

Usage policies and legal notice for WEB pages. Please go to: http://www.rbtaylor.net/legal_information.htm  and read. The act of accessing and using this and related web pages explicitly assumes that you have read that page, fully understand it, agree to all of the conditions of use stated therein, and fully indemnify R. B. Taylor and Temple University as described there.

Basics

Instructor R. B. Taylor
Time Fridays 2:00 - 4:30, GH 553
Session 1 2/6/09
Session 2 2/20/09
Session 3: 3/20/09
MAKEUP DATE FOR SESSION 1:
3/6/09
MAKEUP DATE FOR SESSIONS 2 or 3
4/3/09

NOTE. Depending on the number of workshop participants, some sessions may run up to three hours. Please allow for an additional half hour in your schedule if you can.

Office 536-537 Gladfelter Hall
Office Hours Mondays 4 - 6 pm and by appointment
If these times do not work and you need to see me, please call and we can set up an appointment any time.

Further I have a "you can hide but you can't run open and closed door" office policy. This means that outside of posted office hours (a) if my office door is open feel free to c'mon in and (b) If my door is closed but I am here do not hesitate to knock; I am happy to speak with you if I am not under a raging deadline.

Contact 215.204.7169 (v); 610.446.9023 (fax).
You also can ring 1-7918 and ask Ms. Salerno (1-7918) if we need to chat and the phone is not being picked up. I will give you folks my home phone number. Since you are graduate students calls in the evenings and weekends are ok up to 9 pm.

EMAIL: at gmail.com write to: tuclasses


PLEASE USE THIS ACCOUNT FOR ALL CORRESPONDENCE.

During the regular semester it may take me up to a week to reply. If you need an answer sooner, then please call.

 

Workshop Goals

These three workshops provide basic information, practice, and feedback related to three specific areas of college-level teaching.

1. You will learn about the connections between what we teach, how we teach, and why we teach. More specifically, in workshop 1 you will consider and discuss the connections between teaching philosophies, course goals, course structure, course expectations, course assignments, and assessments. You will learn to reflect on what you are doing when you construct a course.

2. You will learn about instructional strategies. More specifically, in workshop 2 you will learn about the different ways that content and activities can be structured within and outside of the classroom, and how choices about content, structure, timing, and your behavior might align both with broader course goals and instructor philosophy, and with individual differences among students. You will be exposed to some information on the different ways that students learn, and the different ways students react to various instructional activities. You will practice observing and delivering instruction.

3. You will learn about variations in student assessment. More specifically, in workshop 3 you will learn about the many implicit and explicit choices you make when you construct assignments and the related pre-event and post-event activities. You will practice constructing one specific assignment.

4. [Implementing this goal depends on how the series is progressing.] At the end of the workshop series you will be asked to comment on a syllabus you have prepared, reflecting on how it does/does not link to your philosophy, course goals, and what we know about how students learn.

Your Commitment/Prerequisites

You are in these workshops for one or more of three possible reasons:
1) You have not yet served as a primary instructor in a college-level course.
2) You already have served as a primary instructor in a college-level course but seek to strengthen your teaching skills.
3) You would like to be eligible, either for the upcoming summer session, or for a later semester, to serve as a primary instructor in an undergraduate course offered by the Department of Criminal Justice.

Regardless of your reasons for attending, by enrolling as a participant you are making a commitment to
a) attend at least three sessions, at least two of which must be regular sessions. Only one make up date is allowed.
b) being a full participant in the sessions you attend.
c) completing required readings in a timely and professional manner
d) completing other assignments in a timely and professional manner

In short, either you are in or you are out.

Your "Grade"

You will not receive a "grade" at the end of this workshop series. Rather, if you

a) attend three sessions, including at least two regular sessions,
b) participate in those sessions,
c) complete all assigned work in a timely manner,
d) and the quality of the work completed is of acceptable quality,

the instructor will write you a memo at the end of the semester indicating that you have satisfied the above criteria. A copy will go to the department chair and the person in charge of scheduling, currently Professor Rosen.

In short, you will be eligible to serve as a primary instructor for a Department of Criminal Justice undergraduate offering in later semesters.

Please note, however, that eligibility does not guarantee that will happen. The teaching opportunities for graduate students as primary instructors are limited. Future availabilities, and whether you are selected, depend on a wide range of factors beyond just your eligibility. Being eligible is a necessary but not a sufficient condition for being selected as a primary instructor.

Alternatives

Students who seek to be eligible to serve as a primary instructor for a Department of Criminal Justice course during the 2009 summer sessions have no option.

For those who might like to teach in Summer 10, my understanding is that the Teaching and Learning Center (TLC) is preparing a semester-long teaching course. You can find the current outline of that course under documents on the Blackboard site.

Uses of Blackboard 

There is an associated Blackboard site, currently listed as the organization

SPRING 2009: CJ GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING SESSIONS (12172008101150)

If you have told me of your interest I will enroll you in the organization.

The Blackboard site will host all documents. These will include pdfed chapters from the two required texts (see below). PLEASE NOTE: all of those chapters from these books will be removed at the end of the semester.

The Blackboard site also will have a link to this web page.

Disclaimers

This workshop series is not intended to serve as an acceptable substitute for a semester-long teacher training course. It hopes just to fill a short-term departmental need. If you complete this workshop series successfully, there is an excellent chance that you would benefit enormously from completing an additional teacher training course. Please do not think once you have done these workshops you have had all the training you need.

The instructor is not a certified expert in this area. He does not hold any credentials that might suggest he has more expertise in teaching about teaching than numerous other faculty in his department, college, or university.

Statement on electronic disruptions

I expect you to have all cell phones, pagers, pdas, ipods, headsets and related devices off during each class. You will not text during class. If you bring a notebook computer for taking notes, the only page I expect to see up on your screen is your word processing. No surfing during class. If for some urgent personal reason you need to leave your cell phone on for an expected call, talk to me about this at the beginning of class. If you do not behave in accord with my expectations on this matter it will detract significantly from class goals, and will be interpreted as disruptive class behavior given those goals. I will proceed accordingly.

Other Student Concerns

Any student needing accommodation arising from a disability should contact the instructor privately at his/her earliest convenience. He/she also should contact the office of Disability Resources 215 204 1280.

Students are expected to adhere to the ethical standards appearing in Students Rights, Code of Conduct, and Disciplinary Procedures.

Rights and Responsibilities                                          

 http://policies.temple.edu/getdoc.asp?policy_no=03.70.02

Academic Misconduct:                                               

http://www.temple.edu/grad/policies/index.htm

  CLICK HERE to see College Policy circa 1983 - I think this gives you the most detail. STRONGLY RECOMMENDED

Main reading sources

The bulk of readings come from two books.

Lang, James M. (2008). On Course: A Week-byWeek Guide to Your First Semester of College Teaching. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

    About $20 from Amazon, plus shipping.

    Copies of the assigned chapters will be available on Blackboard.

McKeachie, Wilbert J., and Marilla Svinicki (2006). McKeachie's Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research and Theory for College and University Teachers. New York: Houghton Mifflin. Twelfth Edition.

    About $60 from Amazon, plus shipping.

    Copies of the assigned chapters will be available on Blackboard.

    You can find very cheap ($2 + shipping) copies of this book on used book cites like abebooks.com. The problem is these are earlier editions, and there were subtle but important changes made in the 12th edition. If you are going to read this book, you might as well get the latest thinking.