CJ 8106/406  Criminological Theories Fall 2016

Sequence of Topics and Readings

Course Home

DATE OF LAST UPDATE: 9/18/2016
 For details on books go to books listed page

Date

Topic and Readings (readings are to be done BY that week)
(Bb) means reading can be found on Blackboard site
If individual chapters or page numbers are NOT listed, that means read the entire volume.

8/29

There is reading that needs to be done by this first class.

(1) Paternoster, R., & Bachman, R. (Eds.). (2001). Explaining criminals and crime. Los Angeles: Roxbury. Chapter 1

(2) Akers, R. L., & Sellers, C. S. (2012). Criminological Theories. (6th Edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 1

NOTE: Over the course of the semester, you probably want to work through one of these books. Here is the main difference. Paternoster is descriptive. Akers is descriptive and critical. The critical part you may find helpful.

TOPICS. Course introduction. Purpose. Requirements. What is a seminar? Why this approach. How to succeed in this course. How to fail. What is crime theory? Varieties of crime theory.
Approaching theory with your own predliections. How to code and decode theory. Some meta-theory basics. Evaluating theory

9/5 Labor Day: No Class
9/12

MACRO-LEVEL - COMMUNITY CRIME DIFFERENCES - CULTURE
TOPIC: Collective efficacy, crime, the neighborhood effect, and selection
READING: Sampson,Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect
READ ONLY chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10, 15 << LIST OF CHAPTERS CHANGED

9/19

MACRO-LEVEL - COMMUNITY CRIME DIFFERENCES - STRUCTURE
TOPIC: The racial spatial divide and community crime differences: What are the sources of community crime rate differences between White and African-American urban neighborhoods?
READING: Peterson & Krivo,Divergent Social Worlds

9/26

SUPRA-MACRO-LEVEL - INTERNATIONAL DIFFERENCES IN SERIOUS CRIME
TOPIC: How do cultural variations and institutional differences explain international serious crime differences? IAT
READING: Messner, S. F., & Rosenfeld, R. (2000). Crime and the American dream (Third ed.). Monterey: Wadsworth.

10/3

Rosh Hashanah

CRIME IN GROUP CONTEXT PART I: WHITE COLLAR CRIME
Sutherland, E. H. (1983). White Collar Crime: The Uncut Version. New Haven: Yale University Press.
READ ONLY: Preface, chapters 1,2,3,4,14,15

10/10

 

 

10/XX

CRIME IN GROUP CONTEXT PART II: ORGANIZED CRIME AND NETWORKS (These readings will be available on Bboard)
(1) Haller, M. (2013). The Bruno Family in Philadelphia: Organized crime as a regulatory agency (Chapter 6). In M. G. Yeager (Ed.), Illegal Enterprise: The Work of Historian Mark Haller (pp. 103-120). New York: University Press of America.
(2) Haller, M. (2013). Organized crime in urban society: Chicago in the Twentieth Century (Chapter 3). In M. G. Yeager (Ed.), Illegal Enterprise: The Work of Historian Mark Haller (pp. 35-60). New York: University Press of America.
(3) Smith, C. M., & Papachristos, A. V. (2016). Trust Thy Crooked Neighbor: Multiplexity in Chicago Organized Crime Networks. American Sociological Review, 81(4), 644-667. doi:10.1177/0003122416650149

REVIEW SESSION

10/17

FIRST IN CLASS EXAM

10/24 CRIME IN CONTEXT, AN INTERACTIONIST VIEW: SITUATIONAL ACTION THEORY
Wikstrom, P.-O. H., Oberwittler, D., Treiber, K., & Hardie, B. (2012). Breaking Rules: The Social and Situational Dynamics of Young People's Urban Crime.  Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. (chapters 1, 2, 3, 7, 9)
RECOMMEND - Chapter 4 - skim to get a sense of the spatial patterning of land use and criminal activity
10/31

INDIVIDUAL LEVEL: THE BONDS
TOPIC: Bonds and control theory and delinquent acts
READ: Hirschi, T. (1969). Causes of delinquency (Transaction Publishers 2002 edition ed.). Berkeley: Unversity of California Press.
Chapters 1-12

11/7

INDIVIDUAL LEVEL IN CONTEXT: BONDS, MODERNITY AND A SAFE CITY
READ: Singer, S. (2014) America's Safest City: Delinquency and Modernity in Suburbia. New York: NYU Press. Chapters: TBA

11/14

INDIVIDUAL LEVEL: OVER TIME
TOPIC: Individuals and personal history: The Life course perspective
READ: Laub, J., & Sampson, R. J. (2003). Shared Beginnings, Divergent Lives: Delinquent Boys to Age 70. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.

11/21 THANKSGIVING WEEK -- NO CLASS
11/28

INDIVIDUAL LEVEL: CRIMINOGENIC TENDENCIES
TOPIC: General Theory of Crime
READING: Gottfredson, M., & Hirschi, T. (1990). A General Theory of Crime. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
- Chs. 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 12

12/5

REACTIONS TO THE BREAKING OF LAWS: GOING SUPER MACRO
Garland, D. (2002). The Culture of Control: Crime and Social Order in Contemporary Society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press

12/12

GOING SUPER MICRO: QUESTIONS ABOUT MIND AND BIOCRIMINOLOGY
Satel, S., & Lilienfeld, S. (2013). Brainwashed: The Seductive Appeal of Mindless Neuroscience. New York: Basic Books.Skip chapters 2 & 3

Murphy, K. (August 28, 2016). Do you believe in God or is that a software glitch? [ONLINE: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/28/opinion/sunday/do-you-believe-in-god-or-is-that-a-software-glitch.html?ref=opinion ]. New York Times.

RECOMMENDED
Eklund, A., Nichols, T. E., & Knutsson, H. (2016). Cluster failure: Why fMRI inferences for spatial extent have inflated false-positive rates. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(28), 7900-7905. doi:10.1073/pnas.1602413113

LAST DAY OF CLASSES
STUDY DAYS: TUES 12/13 WED 12/14

12/14

12/17

REVIEW SESSION 1-2 pm, Classroom

Final assignment due via SafeAssign Upload ONLY on Blackboard 12/17 - 11:55 PM

See assignment

12/19 SECOND IN CLASS EXAM - - Computer Lab, 5th floor